Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Siphon Hose - article from Garf.org

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Siphon Hose - article from Garf.org

    THE SIPHON HOSE-PLEASE BE EXTRA CAREFULů..
    I have to say that I enjoy all parts of this hobby expect the siphon hose. I have avoided it at all costs. I will never ever forget the first time I witnessed LeRoy quickly needed to run water from one tank to another before the first tank would run over. He would put one end of the plastic hose in the tank and the other in his mouth and suck so that the water would start to flow and he would move the hose from his mouth into the tank he wanted to fill next. I can not remember a time that he did this that he did not cough as some of the water from the siphon went into his mouth.
    I decided right then and right there that I would not attempt to use this method no matter what. For the thoughts that went flowing through my brain went something like this. Oh my gosh I wonder who might have had their mouths on that hose before. I wonder where that hose was used last. Was it used to siphon grunge water, was it used to exchange water for a water change, was it in the propagation tanks, etc.
    Mind you to swear off the siphon hose was no easy task, for my tanks with sumps often one tube or another would get clogged and over flow the tank. When it was time to do a water change there was always someone coming to my rescue to remove the water out as the clean saltwater went in.
    Oh and it did not take long before I realized that the over flow box could also get clogged and the thin hose would need to be started as a snail or algae or even an air bubble caused the over flow to stop working properly.
    We had several siphon hoses so there was no way for me to keep track which ones were used to perform which task. There was not one hose assigned to one persons mouth, and none of them were marked with which end went into the tank and which side was the side to put your mouth on to start the siphon.
    As I started to understand corals, and how they have developed so many toxicants to defend themselves from one another the issue with the siphon hose became a much bigger issue with me. As I started to understand all the different types of bacteria, viruses, protozoans, infections, etc, the siphon hose became a much much greater concern for me. I called a staff meeting and informed every one about my concerns. For we were not just touching corals, having our hands in the tanks we were cutting them. There would be no way to know what could be in any drop of water swallowed.
    I could never ever break LeRoy of using the siphon hose, but I did mark them and often would discard the old ones, but that still did not resolve my fears.
    This worry, this concern, this risk should be considered any time you pull out your trusty siphon hose and put it to the task of moving water.
    I can not think of a time that when my overflow box would need the siphon started that one person or another did not get a mouth full of water that they would quickly rinse out of their mouths. However it should be noted it does not take much of any one of the toxic weapons within our closed systems to cause tremendous illness.
    This concern is true not only for our reef tanks, but needs to be considered when you have fish only, and freshwater systems.
    There are a whole host of diseases our fish can encounter. Add to that fact that the chemicals used to treat any one of these systems is cause for alarm.
    I think of how in our closed systems we are actually creating new strains of bacteria, new infections, new viruses that we have no clue what effect they would have if just one drop of water is swallowed.
    Please be carefulů.you need to wear gloves, you need eye protection but you must not forget the effect siphoning could also have on ones immune system. The hospitals, the doctors, even the researchers would have a hard time trying to figure out what it was that made you so sick. Was it a toxic reaction from a coral, was it a chemical that was used in treatment of a fish, or tank. Could it be a bacteria and if so which one, same is true for infections, viruses, etc. So little is known, so little is understood.
    What I do know for sure is that we need to be more careful, we need to pay attention, we need to not take risks.
    When one witnesses how quickly disease can spread in our wild reefs, even in our captive systems, we need to take every precaution to protect ourselves. When one witnesses a coral die, or get caught in a powerhead, and the toxicants released in the water can wipe out an entire tank we need to take every precaution to protect ourselves. Anemone, sponges, sea cucumbers, palythoa zoanthids, are some of the most dangerous animals. So many of the toxicants are released when stressed, touched, propagated, and even moved from one tank to another we need to take every precaution When uses chemicals we need to take every precaution.
    We must take into consideration what a drop of that water from any one of our systems could have on our health or the health of our loved ones, or our pets.
    Article By Sally Jo Headlee
    Pictures by Sally Jo Headlee

  • #2
    Wow I never thought about all that bad stuff being in my tank water.

    I bought a little hand pump made for starting a siphon so I don't have to get tank water in my mouth any more.
    Lynne

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a siphon bulb that works fine. I didn't think about the issues until I read the article.

      Comment


      • #4
        your not a professional till you got a mouth full a couple of times!!! Jus don't swallow
        Ken Higgins
        120 gallon reef
        125 gallon fresh water
        50 gallon fresh water

        Comment


        • #5
          Mouth full of what? I missed the post..

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mookie63 View Post
            Mouth full of what? I missed the post..
            Salt water.......perv....lol
            Ken Higgins
            120 gallon reef
            125 gallon fresh water
            50 gallon fresh water

            Comment


            • #7
              Yes, I am addicted to saltwater fish and corals , the perv. Was an added bonus, lol

              Comment


              • #8
                Ken Higgins
                120 gallon reef
                125 gallon fresh water
                50 gallon fresh water

                Comment

                Working...
                X